Search the world with 36 nations plus UN plus IMF agreeing with china that coastal ports and railRoads link over 90% of world trade $BR0 china
#BR12 UN IMF #BR1 japan far east isles asean10 Malaysia #BR2 Bangladesh india Pakistan #BR3 Russia #BR4 central euro/asia #Br5 west euro Italy Switzerland #BR6 n america #BR7 UAE mideast #BR8 med sea nations #BR9 africa - egypt rwanda #BR10 Latin AM #BR11 Arctic/polar

top Belt Road Maps of 2018 s Entrepreneurial networks best cases in China & Bangla:
NATURES CHILDREN:
BillionGirlsBoys ask: can every banker/educator see their trust in Belt Road's top 100 stories.. Is Trump King Canute? Valueless is The economist whose world trade maps fail poorest billion youth's livelihoods in our children's worldwide

THE DC SPRING 2018
(BRI) Belt Road Imagineering is now trusted by 70 national leaders as empowering the sustainbility generation- which of these 100 stories can help bankers or educators near you join in to this system for mapping win-win trades aligned to the sustainability goals generation? portal 1

catalogue world record jobs creators by 13 BRI maps- tour BR clubs- EWTP celebrate first people freed by e-commerce and jack ma
.BRI.school map top 13 sdg world trade routes 0 inside china, 1 East-Belt,
2 South-Belt; 3NorthBelt
4 centre eurasia &E.Euro; 5WEuro 6 N.Am; 7 MidEast8MedSea 9Africa 10LatinAm11 Arctic Circle 12UN-urgent....
BELT Road quiz

Belt quiz is about earth's seas and coastal belt - which coastal belt is your country most dependent on, does if have a superport connecting maps of world favorite superports, do your peoples have access to this superport (nb we recommend analysing countries imprt and exports by 1 energy, 2 all other goods
Road quiz : what are your continents longest roads (designed as including all of railroad or car-road, pipes for energy, water, sanitaion; tech cables)- do your peoples have access to the great roads

technology now permis us to play game: which peoples have been most deprived by accidents of history to basic belt road freedoms- among 10 most populated nations no people have been less included than those in bangladesh- tell us where else you map.....................
...
today BRAC.net offers the livelihood learning network poorest billion communities need most - 40 years ago
online library of norman macrae--.........................Entrepreneurial Revolution - curriculum: how to value small enterprise and sustainability exponentials of net generation - by alumni of Norman Macrae The Economist 1968. By 1976, Norman best news ever: the fifth of the world (whose brand reality is) Chinese can be valued by netgen as critical friends to uniting sustainability race for planet and humanity
eg EWTP : 21st C version of Silk Road of celebrated by Marco Polo and Hangzhou goal 14 oceansAIIB 1 ted hosts -- 2017 year of mapping sustainability banking -china to commercialize 5g by 2020 -valuing culture -jack ma 1 2e3 .Chinathanks.com maps 1) countries joining Chinese inspired sustainability open systems solutions as well as 2) which global youth professions (eg coding) are mapping value sustaining trades with china

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

 Legal 

United States

Stanford professors urge U.S. to end program looking for Chinese spies in academia

3 minute read
1/4

Stanford University's campus is seen from atop Hoover Tower in Stanford, California, U.S. on May 9, 2014. REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach/File Photo

Sept 13 (Reuters) - A group of Stanford University professors has asked the Justice Department to stop looking for Chinese spies at U.S. universities, joining an effort by human rights groups to end a Trump administration program they said caused racial profiling and was terrorizing some scientists.

The "China Initiative," launched in late 2018, aimed to prevent U.S. technology theft by China but has since "deviated significantly from its claimed mission," according to a Sept. 8 letter signed by 177 Stanford faculty members and made public by them on Monday.

"(I)t is harming the United States' research and technology competitiveness and it is fueling biases that, in turn, raise concerns about racial profiling," the letter said.

That letter is now being supported by about 140 University of California, Berkeley professors who have signed on since late last week, according to Randy Schekman, Berkeley professor and Nobel prize winner for physiology or medicine.

Asked about criticism of the China Initiative, Justice Department spokesperson Wyn Hornbuckle said the government was "dedicated to countering unlawful (Chinese) government efforts to undermine America's national security and harm our economy," while acknowledging the threat of hate crimes against Asia Americans. "We take seriously concerns about discrimination," he said.

The Justice Department has published details of at least 27 cases related to the initiative, with results including some guilty pleas, some cases dropped and some ongoing.

Professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University were among those charged, as were five Chinese scientists who were visiting scholars last year - although those charges were dropped in July. read more

On Thursday, a federal judge in Tennessee acquitted a professor accused of hiding Chinese ties in his NASA research grant application, saying prosecutors failed to provide evidence he intended to defraud the government.

"I think what the FBI's done in most cases is to scare people - investigating people and interrogating them. And it's harmful to the country," said Peter Michelson, Stanford's senior associate dean for the natural sciences and an organizer of the letter.

Another organizer, Stanford physicist Steven Kivelson, said he became involved because he saw his colleagues of Chinese origin suffered from the hostile environment they were subjected to due to the initiative.

Former U.S. Energy Secretary and Nobel prize winner Steven Chu, a professor at Stanford, said that rather than help protect U.S. advantages in technology and understanding, the program risked undermining America's lead in science.

"We were the brain gain for half a century," he told Reuters in an interview. "You really want to throw this away?"

Reporting By Jane Lanhee Lee; Editing by Peter Henderson, Daniel Wallis and Steve Orlofsky

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Thursday, September 2, 2021

events connecting unga76 2021

 



China’s Environmental Foreign Relations

Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM (America/New_York)

Registration Required

Hosts

Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics

Watch On

Zoom

Languages

EnglishEnglish

Channels

Climate & Environment

Government & Politics

Sustainable Development

Ahead of COP26 in November, LSE IDEAS’ China Foresight Project, the Grantham Research Institute at LSE, and LSE’s Department of International Relations co-host a panel discussing the evolution of China’s own understanding of the environment, the role of domestic stakeholders in shaping Chinese environmental diplomacy and Beijing’s role in the upcoming COP26.

Over the last decade, China has moved from being a follower towards taking on a leadership role in global environmental governance. Framed within the concept of “Ecological Civilization”, Xi Jinping’s ambitious pledge for China to become carbon neutral by 2060 requires stark changes in China’s domestic political economy. By investigating the role of Chinese interest groups, Dr Wang-Kaeding’s new book sheds light on how sub-state actors adapt to and shape China’s environmental policy and diplomacy. Given China’s status as the largest emitter of greenhouse gases worldwide, understanding how domestic dynamics influence Beijing’s approach to climate negotiations is critical to any sustainable and far-sighted international action on climate change.

Meet the speakers

Robert Falkner is the Interim Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and an Associate Professor of International Relations at The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). He also serves as the Academic Director of the TRIUM Global Executive MBA programme, an alliance between LSE, NYU Stern School of Business and HEC Paris. He is the author of Environmentalism and Global International Society (Cambridge University Press, 2021) and the co-editor of the forthcoming book Great Powers, Climate Change and Global Environmental Responsibilities (Oxford University Press, 2022).

Judith Shapiro is the director of the Masters in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development for the School of International Service at American University. She was one of the first Americans to live in China after US-China relations were normalized in 1979, and taught English at the Hunan Teachers’ College in Changsha, China. Her research and teaching focus on global environmental politics and policy, the environmental politics of Asia, and Chinese politics under Mao. She is the author, co-author or editor of ten books, including China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet (with Yifei Li, Polity 2020), China’s Environmental Challenges (Polity 2016), Mao’s War against Nature (Cambridge University 2001), and Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance (co-edited with John-Andrew McNeish, Routledge 2021). Mao’s War against Nature inspired a documentary, and her early experiences in China were made into a television feature film.

Heidi Wang-Kaeding is Lecturer in International Relations at Keele University. Her research focuses on global environmental governance, economic statecraft in East Asia, and the role of emotions in international politics. She is interested in how the rise of China is reshaping regional power dynamics in East Asia and how China’s emergence as a superpower creates normative effects on multilateral governance. She is the author of China’s Environmental Foreign Relations (Routledge, 2021). Her recent article (co-authored with Malte Kaeding) “Red Capital in Hong Kong” (2019) won the 2020 Literati Award. She is a Co-Founder of the Hong Kong Studies Association (HKSA) based in the U.K.

Meet the chair

William Callahan is Professor of International Relations at LSE. His research examines the interplay of culture and politics, and visual global politics. Callahan’s most recent book is Sensible Politics: Visualizing International Relations (Oxford University Press, 2020). His other work includes China: The Pessoptimist Nation (OUP, 2010) and the documentary film “Great Walls” (2020), which asks why we hate Trump’s wall and love the Great Wall of China.